philatelism.com terms of use | contact us | links | home
Search Stamps: search
results per page:                browse
11 August 2009
16/2009
Commemorative Issue

Corrugated Landscapes

Australia
Flexible, lightweight, cheap and reusable, corrugated iron is a familiar material in the Australian landscape. It features in the sheds, fences and water tanks that populate our country and suburban environments. We have come to identify it as our own, to the extent that it was a star character in the "Tin Symphony" at the closing ceremony of the Sydney Olympic Games.

Corrugated iron - which despite its name is now always made of steel - is metal crimped so as to greatly increase its strength. A product of industrial and imperial Britain, where it was invented and patented in 1829, it was exported to Australia from 1850 on. As a result of the demands of the gold rush, by 1880 Australia had become Britain's biggest customer.

Corrugated iron arrived here as a building material, as roofing for verandahs and in the form of portable shops, sheds and churches. Vast numbers of prefabricated dwellings were erected to house colonial settlers, gold miners and other workers. Buildings needed to be constructed quickly, and the flexible, lightweight, cheap corrugated iron was well-suited to this purpose.

Today corrugated iron pervades our cities; it is no longer just a symbol of the bush. Available in a variety of profiles and multicoloured coatings, it is a popular material for roofing, water storage, warehouses and factories. Two award-winning railway stations have made it a feature of their spectacular roofs - the Southern Cross Railway Station in Melbourne and Olympic Park Railway Station in Sydney.

Water Tank, SA  

Water Tank, SA

:

The stamp shows a typical rusted tank on hardwood posts within a dry Australian country landscape. This is a typical landscape on the Fleurieu Peninsula, SA, and photographed by Christopher Potter.

Traditional Home  

Traditional Home

:

The photograph was taken in Broken Hill, NSW, by photographer Eric Sierens. From colonial times, corrugated iron has been used to make vast numbers of portable, prefabricated dwellings to house colonial settlers, miners and other workers, and has been sought after because it is a flexible, lightweight and cheap material.

Shearing Shed  

Shearing Shed

:

This Nissen hut was converted into a shed at Bushy Park Cattle Station, Queensland, and is here photographed by Jaen-Marc La Roque. Widely used during both world wars and in subsequent conflicts, Nissen huts have since been recycled as migrant hostels, churches, schools and farm sheds.

Magney House  

Magney House

:

This contemporary home at Bingie Bingie Point, NSW, is by architect Glenn Murcutt and photographed by Anthony Browell. Murcutt is internationally famous and won the Pritzker Prize in 2000 - the world's most prestigious architecture award. All his designs are tempered by the land and climate of his native Australia. This stamp shows Magney House, stretching across a wind-swept site overlooking the ocean. Its asymmetric V-shaped corrugated iron roof collects rainwater that is recycled for drinking and heating.

Technical Information

Issue Date: 2009-08-11
FDI Withdrawal Date: 2009-11-08
Denominations: 4 x 55c
Designer: Andrew Hogg
Printer: Energi Print
Paper: Tullis Russell
Paper (self-adhesive): B90
Printing Process: Lithography
Size: 37.5mm x 26mm
Performations: 13.86 x 14.6
Sheet Layout: Panes of 25 modules of 50
Special Feature: Decorative gutter
National Postmark: Rippleside, Vic 3215
copyright notice: This material has been reproduced with permission of the Australian Postal Corporation. The original work is held in the National Philatelic Collection.
philatelism.com - Last Updated (UTC Time) - 2018-03-23 15:38:48
Design & Programming & Copyright © 2006-2018 Andreas Liverdos. All Rights Reserved.
Disclaimer: Use of this site implies acceptance of its terms of use. The text on this site does not necessarily represent the view or opinion of the site owner.